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Orphaned by the Colour of My Skin: A Stolen Generation Story

Orphaned by the Colour of My Skin: A Stolen Generation Story
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US$ 49.50

I need to emphasise that my time in The Home of the Good Shepherd caused me mental trauma, which I feel destroyed my soul as a person.

Some of the children cannot understand the child that I became. I became a very different person in that I caused physical and mental abuse to other children, which means that today I live with the terrible regrets of being a kid and locked up in a horrible situation that was foreign to me.

I hope that my readers will understand and that others can see why I acted in the way that I did. I am not happy with what I became and I have had to live with this till today. Being able to tell this story is the foundation of my recovery and well-being. AUTHOR

In an invasive, paternalistic, federal public policy environment for Indigenous communities, this book provides an in-depth account of one person's experiences as a ‘Stolen Generation' Aboriginal Australian.

Told from the heart, the book speaks in the raw voice of a grandmother reflecting on her life, focusing on her childhood experiences, subsequent perceptions and life stories. The book presents a rare autobiographical journaling of the psychological impact of institutionalisation on an Indigenous woman, her search for family, community and identity, her psychological breakdown and her personal reconstruction through telling her story in a supportive educational environment.

As an Appendix, the author provides us with a critical analysis and autoethnography - using her story as a case study - that provides deep insights into the personal experience of dealing with forced institutionalisation and social engineering to assimilate Aboriginal people.

I certainly hope that my story will highlight the importance of how life has been for children who have been affected by such atrocities. We hear of how it has been for the Canadian Residential schools and the American Indians as similar to our own experiences here within Australia. History gives us the sadness of the Armenian, Darfur, Jewish and Kurdish situations of genocide - and in other countries.

So why can't we as Aboriginal people now disclose how Australia has treated its own people? AUTHOR

eContent Management Pty Ltd; December 2007
164 pages;
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