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University of Chicago Press

Most popular at the top

  • The Race to 270by Daron R. Shaw

    University of Chicago Press 2008; US$ 22.50

    The Electoral College has played an important role in presidential politics since our nation’s founding, but surprisingly little information exists about precisely how it affects campaign strategy. Daron R. Shaw, a scholar who also worked as a strategist in both Bush-Cheney campaigns, has written the first book to go inside the past two presidential... more...

  • The Cult of the Saintsby Peter Brown

    University of Chicago Press 2009; US$ 17.00

    Following the fall of the Roman Empire in the West, the cult of the saints was the dominant form of religion in Christian Europe. In this elegantly written work, Peter Brown explores the role of tombs, shrines, relics, and pilgrimages connected with the sacred bodies of the saints. He shows how men and women living in harsh and sometimes barbaric... more...

  • Great American Cityby Robert J. Sampson; William Julius Wilson

    University of Chicago Press 2012; US$ 20.00

    For over fifty years numerous public intellectuals and social theorists have insisted that community is dead. Some would have us believe that we act solely as individuals choosing our own fates regardless of our surroundings, while other theories place us at the mercy of global forces beyond our control. These two perspectives dominate contemporary... more...

  • The Amboseli Elephantsby Cynthia J. Moss; Harvey Croze; Phyllis C. Lee

    University of Chicago Press 2011; US$ 52.00

    Elephants have fascinated humans for millennia. Aristotle wrote of them with awe; Hannibal used them in warfare; and John Donne called the elephant “Nature’s greatest masterpiece. . . . The only harmless great thing.” Their ivory has been sought after and treasured in most cultures, and they have delighted zoo and circus audiences... more...

  • The Flash Pressby Patricia Cline Cohen; Timothy J. Gilfoyle; Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz; American Antiquarian Society

    University of Chicago Press 2008; US$ 18.00

    Obscene, libidinous, loathsome, lascivious. Those were just some of the ways critics described the nineteenth-century weeklies that covered and publicized New York City’s extensive sexual underworld. Publications like the Flash and the Whip —distinguished by a captivating brew of lowbrow humor and titillating gossip about prostitutes,... more...

  • Medieval and Early Renaissance Medicineby Nancy G. Siraisi

    University of Chicago Press 2009; US$ 30.00

    Western Europe supported a highly developed and diverse medical community in the late medieval and early Renaissance periods. In her absorbing history of this complex era in medicine, Siraisi explores the inner workings of the medical community and illustrates the connections of medicine to both natural philosophy and technical skills. more...

  • The Age of Everythingby Matthew Hedman

    University of Chicago Press 2008; US$ 16.00

    Taking advantage of recent advances throughout the sciences, Matthew Hedman brings the distant past closer to us than it has ever been. Here, he shows how scientists have determined the age of everything from the colonization of the New World over 13,000 years ago to the origin of the universe nearly fourteen billion years ago. Hedman details,... more...

  • The Scientific Revolutionby Steven Shapin

    University of Chicago Press 2008; US$ 15.00

    "There was no such thing as the Scientific Revolution, and this is a book about it." With this provocative and apparently paradoxical claim, Steven Shapin begins his bold vibrant exploration of the origins of the modern scientific worldview. "Shapin's account is informed, nuanced, and articulated with clarity. . . . This is not to attack or devalue... more...

  • The Fatal Conceitby F. A. Hayek; W. W. III Bartley

    University of Chicago Press 2011; US$ 18.00

    Hayek gives the main arguments for the free-market case and presents his manifesto on the "errors of socialism." Hayek argues that socialism has, from its origins, been mistaken on factual, and even on logical, grounds and that its repeated failures in the many different practical applications of socialist ideas that this century has witnessed were... more...

  • Gender and the Politics of Welfare Reformby Joanne L. Goodwin

    University of Chicago Press 2007; US$ 27.50

    The first study to explore the origins of welfare in the context of local politics, this book examines the first public welfare policy created specifically for mother-only families. Chicago initiated the largest mothers' pension program in the United States in 1911. Evolving alongside movements for industrial justice and women's suffrage, the mothers'... more...