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Slavery in the United States. Antislavery movements

Most popular at the top

  • Evil Necessityby Harold D. Tallant

    The University Press of Kentucky 2015; US$ 30.00

    In Kentucky, the slavery debate raged for thirty years before the Civil War began. While whites in the lower South argued that slavery was good for master and slave, many white Kentuckians maintained that because of racial prejudice, public safety, and property rights, slavery was necessary but undeniably evil. Harold D. Tallant shows how this view... more...

  • The Abolitionists and the South, 1831-1861by Stanley Harrold

    The University Press of Kentucky 2015; US$ 30.00

    Within the American antislavery movement, abolitionists were distinct from others in the movement in advocating, on the basis of moral principle, the immediate emancipation of slaves and equal rights for black people. Instead of focusing on the "immediatists" as products of northern culture, as many previous historians have done, Stanley Harrold examines... more...

  • The Rise of Aggressive Abolitionismby Stanley Harrold

    The University Press of Kentucky 2015; US$ 40.00

    The American conflict over slavery reached a turning point in the early 1840s when three leading abolitionists presented provocative speeches that, for the first time, addressed the slaves directly rather than aiming rebukes at white owners. By forthrightly embracing the slaves as allies and exhorting them to take action, these three addresses pointed... more...

  • The Archaeology of Slaveryby Lydia Wilson Marshall; Catherine M. Cameron; Ryan P. Harrod; Debra L. Martin; Liza Gijanto; Theresa A. Singleton; Lynsey A. Bates; Mark W. Hauser; Kenneth L. Brown; J Cameron Monroe; Neil L. Norman; Chapurukha M. Kusimba; Amitava Chowdhury; Lydia Wilson Marshall; Mary Elizabeth Fitts; Dorian Borbonus; Sarah K. Croucher; Lúcio Menezes Ferreira; Christopher C. Fennell

    Southern Illinois University Press 2014; US$ 50.00

    Plantation sites, especially those in the southeastern United States, have long dominated the archaeological study of slavery. These antebellum estates, however, are not representative of the range of geographic locations and time periods in which slavery has occurred. As archaeologists have begun to investigate slavery in more diverse settings,... more...

  • John Brownby W. E. B. DuBois

    Taylor and Francis 2015; US$ 44.95

    First published in 1909, W.E.B. Du Bois's biography of abolitionist John Brown is a literary and historical classic. With a rare combination of scholarship and passion, Du Bois defends Brown against all detractors who saw him as a fanatic, fiend, or traitor. Brown emerges as a rich personality, fully understandable as an unusual leader with a deeply... more...

  • The Abolitionist Decade, 1829-1838by Kevin C. Julius

    McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers 2004; US$ 49.95

    The years between America's founding and the cusp of the Civil War are often overlooked in discussions of America's struggle over slavery. The conflagration that nearly destroyed the country did not ignite quickly, but was the culmination of a long-smoldering debate that saw significant developments in those intervening decades. In particular,... more...

  • Douglass' Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglassby John Chua

    Wiley 1999; US$ 5.99

    The original CliffsNotes study guides offer expert commentary on major themes, plots, characters, literary devices, and historical background. The latest generation of titles in the series also feature glossaries and visual elements that complement the classic, familiar format. In CliffsNotes on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, you’ll... more...

  • Frederick Douglass's Curious Audiencesby Terry Baxter

    Taylor and Francis 2004; US$ 54.95

    This book attempts to answer a fundamental question: How did Douglass manage to persuade anyone about the evils of slavery, and even impress viewers with his personal qualities, when his speeches were commonly considered mere entertainment, in the same category as Barnum's circus acts? In answering this question, Terry Baxter provides a means of understanding... more...

  • Forbidden Fruitby Betty DeRamus

    Atria Books 2005; US$ 14.00

    Forbidden Fruit is a collection of fascinating, largely untold stories of ordinary men and women who took extraor dinary measures, risking life and limb to be together. It¹s the story of couples who faced mobs, bloodhounds, bounty hunters, and bullets to defy the system that allowed slave masters to breed and sell people like cattle. Some broke the... more...

  • Slave Cultureby Sterling Stuckey

    Oxford University Press 1988; US$ 31.99

    In this ground-breaking study, Sterling Stuckey, a leading cultural historian and authority on slavery, explains how different African peoples interacted on the plantations of the South to achieve a common culture. He argues that, at the time of emancipation, slaves still remained essentially African in culture, a conclusion with profound implications... more...