The Leading eBooks Store Online 4,166,437 members ⚫ 1,355,809 ebooks

New to eBooks.com?

Learn more

Active Math Problem Solving

Problem solving math for 10 - 12 year old students.

Active Math Problem Solving by Ken Smith
Buy this eBook
US$ 7.95
(If any tax is payable it will be calculated and shown at checkout.)

The Active Math booklet represents a response to current trends in mathematics for the development of problem solving skills in students. The photocopy master activities contained within the booklet are designed to interest and stimulate children in the 10 to 12 years age range. They are presented as blackline masters which are able to be photocopied for use in the classroom. Wherever possible the activities are stand alone worksheets although occasionally other materials such as grid paper, glue or card may be required.

Problem Solving Strategies
The activities in the Active Math booklet are thematically grouped and are so structured as to provide an increasing level of difficulty with each successive sheet in the theme. Obviously gifted children in lower years, or less able children in higher years, will both find the structured problems equally challenging.

Knowledge of the problem solving abilities of the students is essential, in order that each child can be presented with an activity which he or she feels comfortable solving and not become frustrated with, because of inappropriate matching.

Initially problem solving activities could be tackled in class groups. This establishes a framework from which the children can branch out to work in smaller problem solving groups and then ultimately, independently.

Ready-Ed Publications; June 2001
48 pages; ISBN 9781863971393
Read online, or download in secure PDF format
Title: Active Math Problem Solving
Author: Ken Smith; Rod Jefferson
 
Excerpt

Initially problem solving activities could be tackled in class groups. This establishes a framework from which the children can branch out to work in smaller problem solving groups and then ultimately, independently.

This step by step approach uses a structured framework for tackling problems:

1. Understand the nature of the problem.
2. Develop a strategy for solving the problem.
3. Carry out the chosen strategy.
4. Look back and check.

1. Understand the nature of the problem.
Ask questions about the problem.
Edit out irrelevant details.
Re-word the problem in simpler terms.
Highlight key words or phrases.
Find similar problems to model from.

2. Develop a strategy for solving the problem.
Discuss alternative strategies.
Use concrete aids.
Use pictures or scenarios.
Use tables or patterns.
Use logic.
Guess, check and alter strategy accordingly.
Use trial and error techniques.
Eliminate inappropriate solutions.

3. Carry out the chosen strategy.
Use aids/materials to assist in the calculation.

4. Look back and check.
Check that the problem has been fully answered.
Discuss the solution and its feasibility.
Be able to present the steps leading to the solution.

A murder has been committed at the Lodge.
You’ve been sent to solve the murder and bring the criminal to justice.

The Lodge contains four rooms, four suspects and four weapons.
At the time of the murder each suspect and each weapon was in a different room.

Here is a plan of the lodge.

 

(drawing)


Ten pieces of information are known to be true.

1. Miss Bailey was in the lounge.

2. Mr Allen was in the same room as the walking stick.

3. The knitting needle was in the dining room.

4. Mr Dale was not in the dining room.

5. The murder took place in the room next door to where the duelling pistol was.

6. The victim was not killed by a blow to the head.

7. Mr Allen was in a room next door to Mrs Carrow.

8. The rat poison was not in the hall.

9. The murderer wasn’t married.

10. Mr Dale was not in a room next door to Mrs Carrow.

Using these logic tables, find out who committed the murder, where and with which
weapon.