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Reading Zone

Language Activities for Grades 5-7 Students.

Reading Zone by Edward Connor
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Reading Zone is a set of fifty reading and comprehension sheets. They have been created to suit the teaching needs of upper elementary school and lower secondary school students. The sheets have been composed in ten thematic groups to establish a sense of continuity and to add more interest. The themes are: Champions, Children, Fairytales, Nursery Rhymes, Magic, Mythology, Fishing, Space, Nations and Rodents. Each thematic set comprises of five different activity sheets. These sheets are: • Analytical Stories: In Reading Zone these are called "Logical Figure It Out". Students need to read the stories and fill out a data grid. The stories have been structured in such a way as to require students to analyse deeper than a direct correlation between the needed information and the written words. For example: "The Martian vessel was of the Flashspeedster class, which isn’t the type of spaceship that is equipped with the Megadestroyer weapon..." This sentence not only contains the directly correlated pieces of information that the ship was Martian and that it was of the "Flashspeedster" class, but also reveals that it did not possess the "Megadestroyer", which when it is processed along with other such "negative" information will lead the students to correctly inferring which spaceship did in fact possess the "Megadestroyer". • Check It Out: In these activities students are presented with two almost identical stories, which have ten differences between them. These differences do not affect the stories in any substantial way and both versions are grammatically correct. They are simply alternate ways of stating certain things. For example: "Strawberry pieces coated with glistening caramel syrup ..." can be rewritten as, "Strawberry bits coated with glistening caramel syrup ..." Obviously the objective is for the students to find and mark all ten differences. • Wrong Word Crosswords: The clues in these puzzles have deliberate "typos" or incorrect words in them. One word in each clue has been altered so that it is still a recognizable word but not the appropriate one. The students have to first find and correct the trick word in a clue before they can understand it, and then proceed as in a regular crossword. This makes these puzzles not only more fun and interesting but also offers an extra learning dimension. • Tile Search: This is essentially a wordsearch activity, however, the letters are placed in a tiled area different and more intricate than the usual type of puzzle consisting of regular squares. This is done to excite interest as well as to make the task somewhat more demanding. When students find all the required words they are left with several "leftover" letters. These letters must be used to discover the mystery sentence. Clues are given to assist the students in reforming the mystery sentence. • Spot the Difference: These activities consist of two drawings in each set that look alike but contain ten subtle differences. This exercise is meant as a fun activity to increase student application and desire to continue the prescribed work. This activity engages students and challenges them to concentrate and examine the page of information before them, helping to stretch their attention span and extend their skills of observation.
Ready-Ed Publications; July 2004
64 pages; ISBN 9781863975995
Read online, or download in secure PDF format
Title: Reading Zone
Author: Edward Connor; Terry Allen; Jane Bourke
 
Excerpt

Check It Out!

The following two paragraphs appear identical but ten changes have been made to the second one. Find and mark them. Some of the alterations are obvious while others have to be hunted down with a microscope.

Freddie was a very naughty boy but one particular morning he woke up in a more unpleasant state of mind than usual. He grumbled all through breakfast and slammed the door when he left for school. The first unlucky person he passed was Mrs Gardner, a sweet little old lady who lived next door. Mrs Gardner smiled and said a cheery good morning. Freddie looked at her, crossed his eyes, pouted his lips, wrinkled his nose and poked his tongue right out at her. Down the road the postman made the mistake of saying, "Hello, young Fred." Freddie looked at him, crossed his eyes, pouted his lips, wrinkled his nose and poked his tongue right out at him. Then he poked his tongue out at the policeman on the corner, a mother pushing a pram and the lollipop lady at the school crossing. But when he dared to poke his tongue out at his teacher he went way too far. Off he was sent to the principal’s office. Mr Gravelnose was a big man who sat in a chair that was too small for his over sized fat bum. His face was always sweaty and some say that steam would sometimes sizzle out of the pores in his flabby cheeks. His stomach looked like it was stuffed with ten soccer balls. He sprayed a shower of spittle whenever he bellowed at naughty children and he considered children to be naughty if they dared to smile, or speak, or giggle, or even breathe too loudly. Little Freddie stood in front of the enormous Mr Gravelnose, who cracked his knuckles as he stared down at him. Beads of sweat trickled down the red, puffy face that seemed as large as a car tyre. Then the principal crossed his eyes, pouted his lips, wrinkled his nose and poked his tongue right out at Freddie! Poor little Freddie got such a shock that to this very day he can’t poke out his tongue not even to lick an ice-cream.

Freddie was a very naughty boy but this particular morning he woke up in a more unpleasant state of mind than usual. He mumbled all through breakfast and slammed the door when he left for school. The first unlucky person he passed was Mrs Gardner, a sweet little old lady who lived next door. Mrs Gardner smiled and said a happy good morning. Freddie looked at her, crossed his eyes, pouted his lips, wrinkled his nose and poked his tongue right out at her. Down the road the postman made the mistake of saying, "Hello, young Fred." Freddie looked at him, crossed his eyes, parted his lips, wrinkled his nose and poked his tongue right out at him. Then he poked his tongue out at the policeman on the corner, the mother pushing a pram and the lollipop lady at the school crossing, but when he dared to poke his tongue out at his teacher he went way too far. Off he was sent to the principal’s office. Mr Gravelnose was a big man who sat in a chair that was too small for his fat over sized bum. His face was always sweaty and some say that steam would sometimes sizzle out of the pores in his flabby cheeks. His stomach looked like it was stuffed with ten soccer balls. He sprayed a shower of spittle whenever he bellowed at naughty children and he considered children to be naughty if they dared to smile, or speak, or giggle, or even breathe too loudly. Little Freddie stood in front of the enormous Mr Gravelnose, who cracked his knuckles as he stared down at him. Beads of sweat trickled down the puffy, red face that seemed as large as a car tyre. Then the principal crossed his eyes, pouted his lips, wrinkled his nose and poked his tongue right out at Freddie! Poor little Freddie got such a fright that to this very day he can’t poke his tongue out not even to lick an ice-cream.