Addiction

From Biology to Drug Policy

by

1. Introduction

PART ONE: DRUGS AND THE BRAIN

2. Neurotransmitters: The Brain's Own Drugs

3. Receptors: Locks for the Addictive Keys

4. Addictive Behavior

5. Pain and Pleasure

6. The Seesaw Brain: "Highs" and Adaptations

7. Are Addicts Born or Made?

PART TWO: DRUGS AND THE ADDICTS

8. Nicotine

9. Alcohol and Related Drugs

10. Heroin, Morphine, and Other Opiates

11. Cocaine and Amphetamines

12. Cannabis (Marijuana)

13. Caffeine

14. Hallucinogens

PART THREE: DRUGS AND SOCIETY

15. Prevention: Just Say No?

16. Treatment Addiction, Preventing Relapse

17. Three Lessons from the Street

18. Three Lessons from Abroad

19. Prohibition vs. Legalization- A False Dichotomy

20. New Strategies for Rational Drug Policy

  • Oxford University Press; September 2001
  • ISBN 9780198033523
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF format
  • Title: Addiction
  • Author: Avram Goldstein
  • Imprint: Oxford University Press

In The Press

"An essential tool to understand the biology of addiction as well as the history, politics, and sociology of the issue. Dr. Goldstein brings to the policy debate a powerful scientific perspective based on decades of research backed by common sense."--General Barry R. McCaffrey, USA (Ret.), former Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy
"A visionary drug abuse researcher has taken a comprehensive look at the field, made the science accessible, and raised issues of importance to professionals, policymakers and the general public. This is an excellent starting point for anyone thinking seriously about drug abuse and addiction." --Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D., Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health
"This wonderfully readable book...shows here how science can illuminate the many perplexities of the drug policy front lines. And it is a text illuminated throughout by the author's humanity."--Griffith Edwards, Editor-in-Chief, Addiction
"Goldstein directs this readable small volume toward 'intelligent non-experts.'.... [He] goes to great lengths to show how each class of drugs produces its own form of addiction and why humans will go to such great effort to take them."--Floyd Bloom, M.D., Issues in Science and Technology
"It is written in a lively manner, is admirably logical and systematic, and is peppered with interesting quotations and clinical vignettes.... Deserves to be widely read."--Steven E. Hyman, M.D.