Selected Poems

Natalya Gorbanevskaya

by Natalya Gorbanevskaya,

Selected Poems: Natalya Gorbanevskaya
US$9.99
In 1969 Natalya Gorbanevskaya was sentenced to imprisonment in a Soviet psychiatric hospital for her dissident activities; in 1972 Carcanet published Daniel Weissbort's first translations of her poems, with a transcript of her trial.In this new, enlarged selection of translations he returns to a poet who has continued, in exile, to engage with the cause of human freedom and the poetic traditions of her homeland. Anna Akhmatova regarded Gorbanevskaya as one of the small group of poets who kept Russian poetry alive. Weissbort, one of the leading translators of Russian poetry in Britain, expands our understanding of the continuing vitality of her work. An interview with Valentina Polukhina in which Gorbanevskaya discusses her life and beliefs provides illuminating context.
  • Carcanet; August 2011
  • ISBN 9781847779472
  • Read online
  • Title: Selected Poems
  • Author: Natalya Gorbanevskaya; Daniel Weissbort (ed.)
  • Imprint: Carcanet Poetry

About The Author

Natalya Gorbanevskaya was born in Moscow in 1936. Expelled from Moscow University, she graduated from the Philology Department of Leningrad University. She was arrrested in 1968 for protesting against the Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia. Gorbanevskaya now lives in Paris, where until 2001 she worked for the Russian émigré newspaper Russkaya mysl. She has published a number of poetry collections in Europe and the USA since leaving Russia.Daniel Weissbort edited the magazine Modern Poetry in Translation, which he co-founded with the late Ted Hughes, from 1965-2003. He is Emeritus Professor, University of Iowa, where he directed the MFA Program in Translation. Currently, he is Honorary Professor in the Centre for Translation and Comparative Cultural Studies at the University of Warwick. Weissbort has published numerous collections of translations and has edited several anthologies and collections of his own poetry, most recently Letters to Ted (Anvil, 2003).