Romancing the Atom: Nuclear Infatuation from the Radium Girls to Fukushima

Nuclear Infatuation from the Radium Girls to Fukushima

by

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 0313392803
  • 9780313392795
  • 9780313392801

In 1945, Albert Einstein said, "The release of atomic power has changed everything except our way of thinking … the solution to this problem lies in the heart of mankind." This statement seems more valid today than ever. Romancing the Atom: Nuclear Infatuation from the Radium Girls to Fukushima presents compelling moments that clearly depict the folly and shortsightedness of our "atomic mindset" and shed light upon current issues of nuclear power, waste disposal, and weapons development.

The book consists of ten nonfiction historical vignettes, including the women radium dial painters of the 1920s, the expulsion of the Bikini Island residents to create a massive "petri dish" for post-World War II bomb and radiation testing, the government-subsidized uranium rush of the 1950s and its effects on Native American communities, and the secret radioactive material development facilities in residential neighborhoods. In addition, the book includes original interviews of prominent historians, writers, and private citizens involved with these poignant stories.

More information is available online at www.romancingtheatom.com.

  • ABC-CLIO; August 2012
  • ISBN 9780313392801
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure EPUB format
  • Title: Romancing the Atom: Nuclear Infatuation from the Radium Girls to Fukushima
  • Author: Robert Johnson
  • Imprint: Praeger
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 0313392803
  • 9780313392795
  • 9780313392801

In The Press

"Johnson's familiar tone will make readers feel like he's in the room with them, telling a story about these (sometimes horrifying) events. . . . This book will interest readers who love the history of science, especially 20th-century, military, or weapons history buffs." - Library Journal

About The Author

Robert R. Johnson is professor of rhetoric, composition, and technical communication in the Humanities Department at Michigan Technological University, Houghton.