Building the International Criminal Court

by

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9780521873123
  • 9780511402128
The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first and only standing international court capable of prosecuting humanity's worst crimes: genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. It faces huge obstacles. It has no police force; it pursues investigations in areas of tremendous turmoil, conflict, and death; it is charged both with trying suspects and with aiding their victims; and it seeks to combine divergent legal traditions in an entirely new international legal mechanism. International law advocates sought to establish a standing international criminal court for more than 150 years. Other, temporary, single-purpose criminal tribunals, truth commissions, and special courts have come and gone, but the ICC is the only permanent inheritor of the Nuremberg legacy. In Building the International Criminal Court, Oberlin College Professor of Politics Ben Schiff analyzes the International Criminal Court, melding historical perspective, international relations theories, and observers' insights to explain the Court's origins, creation, innovations, dynamics, and operational challenges.
  • Cambridge University Press; May 2008
  • ISBN: 9780511402128
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF format
  • Title: Building the International Criminal Court
  • Author: Benjamin N. Schiff
  • Imprint: Cambridge University Press
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9780521873123
  • 9780511402128

In The Press

“Building the International Criminal Court is a work of great significance and an essential tool for understanding the ICC. Schiff's book is also very timely; exactly ten years after the signing of the Rome Statute, the ICC is now in full operation, but its every move is still formative and carries lasting implications for its future. While the Court stands as a symbol of progress for humanity, it is also the target of criticism from skeptics who argue that the highly politicized institution remains plagued by inefficiency and institutional deficiencies. Schiff’s presentation of the Court and its beginnings allows the reader to evaluate these criticisms against an informed and comprehensive picture of the institution and its functions. From the outset, Schiff himself is explicit about his concerns that the practical limitations and political nature of the Court present potentially insurmountable challenges. But he also demonstrates the importance of the Court’s work and gives many reasons to be optimistic about the Court's potential. Without advocating for a specific viewpoint, Schiff balances optimism and realism in a way that allows the reader to form his or her own conclusions about the potential and the limitations of the ICC.”
Beatrice Lindstrom, New York University Journal of Law and Politics