Starving the Exam Stress Gremlin

A Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Workbook on Managing Exam Stress for Young People

by Kate Collins-Donnelly

Series: Gremlin and Thief CBT Workbooks

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9781849056984
  • 9781784502140

Stressed out by exams? Then the exam stress gremlin is in town! Exam fears and worries are his favourite foods, and the more of these you feed him, the bigger he gets and the more stressed you become. But he can be stopped! Starve him of stress-related thoughts, feelings and behaviours and feel him and your stress fade away!

Part of the award-winning Starve the Gremlin series and full of engaging activities, this self-help workbook explains what exam stress is, how it develops and the impact it can have - providing the reader with an understanding of their own exam stress. Rooted in cognitive behavioural therapy, it is also bursting with strategies to help the reader manage their exam stress by changing how they think and act.

Starving the Exam Stress Gremlin can be completed independently by young people aged 10+ or with supervision, and with exam stress on the rise among our young people, this invaluable resource will also be of interest to school counsellors, teaching staff, youth workers and social workers and parents.


Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9781849056984
  • 9781784502140

In The Press

Another fantastic addition to the 'Starving the Gremlin' series, which has been truly transformational - both for our young people and the adults who work with them. This latest workbook will be an invaluable resource for young people facing exams and for the adults helping them to prepare.


About The Author

Kate Collins-Donnelly is the author of several inspirational workbooks for young children including Starving the Anger Gremlin, Starving the Anxiety Gremlin and Banish Your Self-Esteem Thief. Having previously been a therapist, psychologist, and criminologist, Kate has worked extensively with children and young people suffering from exam stress and stress associated with the pressures of education. She now runs a successful independent consultancy practice which provides cognitive behavioural therapy, counselling, and coaching, and of which she is also head of the Psychological and Criminological Research Division.