Conventional Wisdom, Parties, and Broken Barriers in the 2016 Election

by Jennifer C. Lucas, Christopher J. Galdieri, Tauna Starbuck Sisco, Mark D. Brewer, Richard Powell, Chad Kinsella, Kevin J. McMahon, Atiya Kai Stokes-Brown, Matthew D. Atkinson, Julia R. Azari, Tyler Benning, Robert G. Boatright, Christopher Chapp, Jack D. Collens, Terri Susan Fine, Dan Hofrenning, Jennifer C. Lucas, Seth Masket, Kyle Mattes, Elizabeth P. Ossoff, David P. Redlawsk, Elizabeth Hahn Rickenbach, Ira J. Roseman, Tauna Starbuck Sisco, Valerie Sperling, Charles Stewart III, Sean Tatar, Joseph E. Uscinski, Emily O. Wanless, Aidan Zielske, Darin DeWitt

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ISBNs
  • 9781498566612
  • 9781498566629
The 2016 presidential election was unconventional in many ways. The election of President Donald Trump caught many by surprise, with a true outsider — a candidate with no previous governmental experience and mixed support from his own party — won the election by winning in traditionally Democratic states with coattails that extended to Republican Senate candidates and resulted in unified Republican government for the first time since 2008. This result broke with the pre-election conventional wisdom, which expected Hillary Clinton to win the presidency and a closer Senate divide. This surprising result led many political scientists to question whether 2016 truly marked a major turning point in American elections as portrayed in the media — a break from the conventional wisdom – or whether it was really the exception that proved the rule.

In this volume, political scientists examine previous theories and trends in light of the 2016 election to determine the extent to which 2016 was a break from previous theories. While in some areas it seems as though 2016 was really just what would have been predicted, in others, this election and the new president pose significant challenges to mainstream theories in political science. In particular, prominent political scientists examine whether voter trends, with particular focus on groups by gender, age, geography, and ethnicity, and election issues, especially the role of the Supreme Court, followed or bucked recent trends. Several political scientists examine the unconventional nomination process and whether this signals a new era for political parties. The role of conspiracy theories and voter confidence in the administration of elections are also discussed. Finally, contributors also examine the indirect effect the presidential candidates, especially Trump, played in congressional election rhetoric.

  • Lexington Books; November 2017
  • ISBN: 9781498566629
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure ePub format
  • Title: Conventional Wisdom, Parties, and Broken Barriers in the 2016 Election
  • Author: Jennifer C. Lucas (ed.); Christopher J. Galdieri (ed.); Tauna Starbuck Sisco (ed.); Mark D. Brewer (contrib.); Richard Powell (contrib.); Chad Kinsella (contrib.); Kevin J. McMahon (contrib.); Atiya Kai Stokes-Brown (contrib.); Matthew D. Atkinson (contrib.); Julia R. Azari (contrib.); Tyler Benning (contrib.); Robert G. Boatright (contrib.); Christopher Chapp (contrib.); Jack D. Collens (contrib.); Terri Susan Fine (contrib.); Dan Hofrenning (contrib.); Jennifer C. Lucas (contrib.); Seth Masket (contrib.); Kyle Mattes (contrib.); Elizabeth P. Ossoff (contrib.); David P. Redlawsk (contrib.); Elizabeth Hahn Rickenbach (contrib.); Ira J. Roseman (contrib.); Tauna Starbuck Sisco (contrib.); Valerie Sperling (contrib.); Charles Stewart III (contrib.); Sean Tatar (contrib.); Joseph E. Uscinski (contrib.); Emily O. Wanless (contrib.); Aidan Zielske (contrib.); Darin DeWitt (contrib.)
  • Imprint: Lexington Books
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9781498566612
  • 9781498566629

In The Press

The 2016 election cycle challenged much of the conventional wisdom in American politics. The role of political parties, endorsements, fundraising, gender norms, ideology, policy issues, party elites, and rank and file voters, all seemingly changed context during this contentious campaign. A great group of authors explore the impact that the Trump and Clinton campaigns had on the national congressional contests and whether 2016 will mark a major turning point in American elections or it was an exception that helped to prove the rule. These political scientists examine previous theories and trends in light of the 2016 election outcomes to determine the extent to which the unconventional campaign undermined or supported those theories. While in some areas it seems as though 2016 was really just what would have been predicted, in others, this election and the style of the new president pose significant challenges to mainstream theories in political science. How did Trump’s plain spoken, outsider political message effect down ballot races? Did past or present Clinton scandals influence voters? How did the Supreme Court vacancy impact Senate races? What role did gender norms and values play in voter’s decisions? This volume aims to answer the above questions and more, and put political science conventional wisdom to the test.


About The Author

Tauna S. Sisco is associate professor of sociology at Saint Anselm College.

Jennifer C. Lucas is professor of politics at Saint Anselm College.

Christopher J. Galdieri is associate professor of politics at Saint Anselm College.