Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle

by Steven Emerson,

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9780521833134
  • 9780511402418
  • 9781107086005
The principles of chemical oceanography provide insight into the processes regulating the marine carbon cycle. The text offers a background in chemical oceanography and a description of how chemical elements in seawater and ocean sediments are used as tracers of physical, biological, chemical and geological processes in the ocean. The first seven chapters present basic topics of thermodynamics, isotope systematics and carbonate chemistry, and explain the influence of life on ocean chemistry and how it has evolved in the recent (glacial-interglacial) past. This is followed by topics essential to understanding the carbon cycle, including organic geochemistry, air-sea gas exchange, diffusion and reaction kinetics, the marine and atmosphere carbon cycle and diagenesis in marine sediments. Figures are available to download from www.cambridge.org/9780521833134. Ideal as a textbook for upper-level undergraduates and graduates in oceanography, environmental chemistry, geochemistry and earth science and a valuable reference for researchers in oceanography.
  • Cambridge University Press; April 2008
  • ISBN: 9780511402418
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure EPUB format
  • Title: Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle
  • Author: Steven Emerson; John Hedges
  • Imprint: Cambridge University Press
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9780521833134
  • 9780511402418
  • 9781107086005

In The Press

'… This book will make an excellent primary text for an upper level or graduate chemical oceanography course as well as an excellent reference for the advanced enthusiast. … The careful presentation of important oceanographic 'problems' interspersed with the necessary review of pure chemistry, biology, and earth science makes this book appropriate for a very broad audience. It is a much-needed addition to the tools for teaching chemical oceanography at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.' Timothy Shaw, Professor of Chemistry, University of South Carolina