Bioethics, Medicine and the Criminal Law: Volume 1, The Criminal Law and Bioethical Conflict: Walking the Tightrope

by Amel Alghrani, Rebecca Bennett, Suzanne Ost

Series: Cambridge Bioethics and Law

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9781107025127
  • 9781139786690
  • 9781139794206
Who should define what constitutes ethical and lawful medical practice? Judges? Doctors? Scientists? Or someone else entirely? This volume analyses how effectively criminal law operates as a forum for resolving ethical conflict in the delivery of health care. It addresses key questions such as: how does criminal law regulate controversial bioethical areas? What effect, positive or negative, does the use of criminal law have when regulating bioethical conflict? And can the law accommodate moral controversy? By exploring criminal law in theory and in practice and examining the broad field of bioethics as opposed to the narrower terrain of medical ethics, it offers balanced arguments that will help readers form reasoned views on the ethical legitimacy of the invocation and use of criminal law to regulate medical and scientific practice and bioethical issues.

  • Cambridge University Press; November 2012
  • ISBN: 9781139786690
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure ePub format
  • Title: Bioethics, Medicine and the Criminal Law: Volume 1, The Criminal Law and Bioethical Conflict: Walking the Tightrope
  • Series: Cambridge Bioethics and Law
  • Author: Amel Alghrani (ed.); Rebecca Bennett (ed.); Suzanne Ost (ed.)
  • Imprint: Cambridge University Press
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9781107025127
  • 9781139786690
  • 9781139794206

In The Press

'… this book is a major success. It is original, thought provoking, and covers a wide range of contemporary issues which everyone interested in bioethics, medicine, and the law will take pleasure in reading. While this book is aimed largely at an academic audience, it will definitely garner interest from practitioners, both medical and legal, scientists and students on undergraduate and postgraduate courses across the country.' Rob Heywood, Medical Law Review