Social Exclusion, Power, and Video Game Play

New Research in Digital Media and Technology

by David G. Embrick, Talmadge J. Wright, Andras Lukacs

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9780739138601
  • 9780739138625
While many books and articles are emerging on the new area of game studies and the application of computer games to learning, therapeutic, military and entertainment environments, few have attempted to contextualize the importance of virtual play within a broader social, cultural and political environment that raises the question of the significance of work, play, power and inequalities in the modern world. Many studies tend to concentrate on the content of virtual games, but few have questioned how power is produced or reproduced by publishers, gamers or even social media; how social exclusion (e.g., race, class, gender, etc.) in the virtual environments are reproduced from the real world; and how actors are able to use new media to transcend their fears, anxieties, prejudices and assumptions. The articles presented by the contributors in this volume represent cutting-edge research in the area of critical game play with the hope to draw attention to the need for more studies that are both sociological and critical.

  • Lexington Books; March 2012
  • ISBN: 9780739138625
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure ePub format
  • Title: Social Exclusion, Power, and Video Game Play
  • Author: David G. Embrick (ed.); Talmadge J. Wright (ed.); Andras Lukacs (ed.)
  • Imprint: Lexington Books
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 9780739138601
  • 9780739138625

In The Press

Social Exclusion, Power, and Video Game Play is a timely collection of essays on virtual worlds and online games. The contributors challenge sociologists (and others) to take these spaces of social interaction seriously, as both revealing and shaping broader cultural dynamics. By exploring issues including the psychology of online identity, the impact of racism and sexism, and relationships between design, play, and fandom, this book helps bring questions of power and inequality to the fore in debates over the impact of online games in virtual-world and physical-world contexts, both very 'real.'


About The Author

David Embrick is assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at Loyola University, Chicago.

J. Talmadge Wright is associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Loyola University, Chicago.

Andras Lukacs is a PhD candidate at Loyola University, Chicago.