Curandera

by Carmen Tafolla,

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 1609402405
  • 9781609402372
  • 9781609402402
Featuring historic photos of the Chicano Movement in San Antonio and a new introduction, this is the 30th-anniversary edition of Carmen Tafolla’s first solo poetry collection. Having filled a cultural and linguistic void in 1983, when it was first published, this compilation showcases the poet's creation of a literary language from the natural Spanish and English code-switching of the barrios of San Antonio. Banned in Arizona along with many other multicultural books, this work celebrates bilingual and bicultural diversity and the power of individual imagination while simultaneously examining social inequities. Many poems from this book have been widely anthologized throughout the past three decades.
  • Wings Press; September 2012
  • ISBN: 9781609402402
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF format
  • Title: Curandera
  • Author: Carmen Tafolla; Norma E. Cantú (photog.)
  • Imprint: Wings Press
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 1609402405
  • 9781609402372
  • 9781609402402

About The Author

Carmen Tafolla is a native of the West-Side barrios of San Antonio and the author of more than 20 books. Tafolla has been recognized by the National Association for Chicano Studies for work which gives voice to the peoples and cultures of this land” and has received numerous recognitions, including: the Art of Peace Award for work which contributes to peace, justice, and human understanding; the Charlotte Zolotow Award for best children’s picture book writing; the Americas Award, presented at the Library of Congress; two Tomás Rivera Book Awards; two ALA Notable Books; and two international Latino Book Awards. A member of the Texas Institute of Letters, she is currently Writer-in-Residence for Children’s, Youth & Transformative Literature at the University of Texas San Antonio. Tafolla received her Ph.D. in Bilingual Education from the University of Texas in 1982 and is still doing postgraduate work on her Ph.C. (Curandera of Philosophy.) She lives in San Antonio, Texas with her husband, Dr. Ernesto M. Bernal, her daughter Ariana, her 94-year-old mother, three cats, two computers, one typewriter, a house full of books, a yard full of hierbitas, many dreams, some remedios, and a molcajete.