Economic Theory and Global Warming

by

In this book, Professor Uzawa modifies and extends the theoretical premises of orthodox economic theory to those broad enough to be capable of analyzing the phenomena related to environmental disequilibrium, particularly global warming, and of finding institutional arrangements and policy measures that may bring about a more optimal state where natural and institutional components are harmoniously blended. He constructs a theoretical framework in which three major problems concerning global environmental issues may effectively be addressed. First, all phenomena involved with global environmental issues exhibit externalities of one kind or another. Secondly, global environmental issues involve international and intergenerational equity and justice. Thirdly, global environmental issues concern the management of the atmosphere, the oceans, water, soil, and other natural resources that have to be decided by a consensus of all affected countries.
  • Cambridge University Press; August 2003
  • ISBN: 9780511055805
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF format
  • Title: Economic Theory and Global Warming
  • Author: Hirofumi Uzawa
  • Imprint: Cambridge University Press

In The Press

'The brilliant economic theorist, Hirofumi Uzawa, has shown in this book the usefulness of sophisticated economic theory in the analysis of the very important and very practical problem of global climate change. He has studied such varied concepts as the optimal levels of tradeable permits and carbon taxes for the optimization of economic activity when account is taken of the effects of climate change. He has gone further to study the dynamic paths that have to be taken to best distribute the costs and gains between the present and the future as well as across countries. Finally, he has contributed a very original analysis of the process of bargaining about climate change among different countries. The book is a remarkable combination of close understanding of the climatic problem and original development of new and appropriate economic theory.' Kenneth Arrow, Stanford University