Educating Latino Boys

An Asset-Based Approach

by David Campos

Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 1452279330
  • 9781452235028
  • 9781452279336
  • 9781452284286

Bring out the best in your male Latino students!

Largely misunderstood and often underserved, Latino boys miss out on key academic opportunities that hinder their achievement and success in school and beyond. Educator David Campos, a champion of higher education for Latino boys, provides strategies to promote success for Latino boys. This book demonstrates how to:

  • Enhance engagement and achievement by addressing Latino boys' needs
  • Explore personal and school-wide beliefs to better understand how to serve this population
  • Develop strategies for motivating Latino boys to pursue higher education
  • Address challenges that Latino boys face in the home and at school

  • SAGE Publications; December 2012
  • ISBN: 9781452279336
  • Edition: 1
  • Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure ePub format
  • Title: Educating Latino Boys
  • Author: David Campos
  • Imprint: Corwin
Subject categories
ISBNs
  • 1452279330
  • 9781452235028
  • 9781452279336
  • 9781452284286

In The Press

"Campos (Univ. of the Incarnate Word) begins his book with the statement that 'Latino boys are often appraised from a deficit perspective because school leaders and teachers appraise students of color using the middle-class, dominant-culture frame of reference.' That is, Latino boys fall short because that standards to which they are held are inappropriate to them. To assauge educators, Campos notes, 'I don't think that school professionals are aware that they are appraising Latino boys in such a fashion.' The irony is that in the pronouncement of an educatior bias, the author does not recognize his own. His evidence is largely anecdotal, and when hard data are introduced (chapter 3, for example), the explanations are made to fit the thesis. The book's importance turns on the degree to which education should be adjusted for ethnic group difference. For those believing that education 'wrong-foots' Latino males by failing to recognize their strengths, the author  provides confirmation. To those less sure that achievement differences refelct the vagaries of educator appraisal, the book will be less important."